Top Tips for Video Creation

DavidMcNab

Trustworthy Member
As most of you know, I take my Rumble channel quite seriously. I approach video creation like a job in many ways and that has meant that it also pays like a job for me. Being able to work from home is an advantage now more than ever.
One of the best things that I ever did was to take a serious approach to storing and organizing my videos. I have a a lineup of data banks on my desk that total more than 35TB of storage space. I fill about one per year because a lot of what I record is 4K and I don't throw much footage away.
I organize in folders and I name all video files with something that makes sense for when I want to search the storage device a year or two later.
For me, many videos are animal related so whatever appears in the video, along with the behaviour will usually appear in the file name. I might add "smooth footage" or "best" to the name of videos that are particularly desirable.
Example: Reef shark eating scraps, best, Belize
If it's not worth sorting through, I leave it in an unsorted and unnamed folder. I might get to it later. But I don't leave much unnamed.
This has made things much easier when I suddenly get inspiration for a video and want to access the footage or simply to explore for footage I've completely forgotten I even had. Imagine how easy it is if some of your old videos suddenly seem relevant and you go looking for them.
I speak with other content creators regularly. Some have told me they are out of new footage. Others have told me that they cannot get out to record anything. I didn't realize the irony in my words, but I've often said I could edit what I have every day for a year or more if I was ever locked in the house.
Storing your videos in this manner takes a little extra time, but why put that valuable footage in a spot where you'll never be able to find it and cash in on the value?
If you ever retire, lose your job, sustain an injury, or find yourself in a global pandemic, that's the time that you can start sorting through your footage and join those who work from home.
This is a great time to organize your old files and name them. You'll likely find something to smile about and something to upload while you're doing it. And you'll save time later when you need it.

What is YOUR top tip and best advice to share with the Rumble community??
 

Rabea

Well-known member
As most of you know, I take my Rumble channel quite seriously. I approach video creation like a job in many ways and that has meant that it also pays like a job for me. Being able to work from home is an advantage now more than ever. One of the best things that I ever did was to take a serious approach to storing and organizing my videos. I have a a lineup of data banks on my desk that total more than 35TB of storage space. I fill about one per year because a lot of what I record is 4K and I don't throw much footage away. I organize in folders and I name all video files with something that makes sense for when I want to search the storage device a year or two later. For me, many videos are animal related so whatever appears in the video, along with the behaviour will usually appear in the file name. I might add "smooth footage" or "best" to the name of videos that are particularly desirable. Example: Reef shark eating scraps, best, Belize If it's not worth sorting through, I leave it in an unsorted and unnamed folder. I might get to it later. But I don't leave much unnamed. This has made things much easier when I suddenly get inspiration for a video and want to access the footage or simply to explore for footage I've completely forgotten I even had. Imagine how easy it is if some of your old videos suddenly seem relevant and you go looking for them. I speak with other content creators regularly. Some have told me they are out of new footage. Others have told me that they cannot get out to record anything. I didn't realize the irony in my words, but I've often said I could edit what I have every day for a year or more if I was ever locked in the house. Storing your videos in this manner takes a little extra time, but why put that valuable footage in a spot where you'll never be able to find it and cash in on the value? If you ever retire, lose your job, sustain an injury, or find yourself in a global pandemic, that's the time that you can start sorting through your footage and join those who work from home. This is a great time to organize your old files and name them. You'll likely find something to smile about and something to upload while you're doing it. And you'll save time later when you need it. What is YOUR top tip and best advice to share with the Rumble community??
Thanks for sharing your tips @DavidMcNab
 

nademedeiros

Well-known member
As most of you know, I take my Rumble channel quite seriously. I approach video creation like a job in many ways and that has meant that it also pays like a job for me. Being able to work from home is an advantage now more than ever.
One of the best things that I ever did was to take a serious approach to storing and organizing my videos. I have a a lineup of data banks on my desk that total more than 35TB of storage space. I fill about one per year because a lot of what I record is 4K and I don't throw much footage away.
I organize in folders and I name all video files with something that makes sense for when I want to search the storage device a year or two later.
For me, many videos are animal related so whatever appears in the video, along with the behaviour will usually appear in the file name. I might add "smooth footage" or "best" to the name of videos that are particularly desirable.
Example: Reef shark eating scraps, best, Belize
If it's not worth sorting through, I leave it in an unsorted and unnamed folder. I might get to it later. But I don't leave much unnamed.
This has made things much easier when I suddenly get inspiration for a video and want to access the footage or simply to explore for footage I've completely forgotten I even had. Imagine how easy it is if some of your old videos suddenly seem relevant and you go looking for them.
I speak with other content creators regularly. Some have told me they are out of new footage. Others have told me that they cannot get out to record anything. I didn't realize the irony in my words, but I've often said I could edit what I have every day for a year or more if I was ever locked in the house.
Storing your videos in this manner takes a little extra time, but why put that valuable footage in a spot where you'll never be able to find it and cash in on the value?
If you ever retire, lose your job, sustain an injury, or find yourself in a global pandemic, that's the time that you can start sorting through your footage and join those who work from home.
This is a great time to organize your old files and name them. You'll likely find something to smile about and something to upload while you're doing it. And you'll save time later when you need it.

What is YOUR top tip and best advice to share with the Rumble community??
I upload ALL my videos to my YouTube channel (many of them as private); that way all sorted too, and if I want to find them, I just check the file name (or even download it, if I don't have the original with me)... I have over 5K videos and am always recording more, so I don't see myself ever running out of videos to upload. Hehe
 

ray1876

Well-known member
I upload ALL my videos to my YouTube channel (many of them as private); that way all sorted too, and if I want to find them, I just check the file name (or even download it, if I don't have the original with me)... I have over 5K videos and am always recording more, so I don't see myself ever running out of videos to upload. Hehe
Might be ok as a plan B backup but don't rely on just Youtube as your only copy. I've seen good channels get banned and deleted for no good cause, innocent mistakes and arbitrary rules.
 

DavidMcNab

Trustworthy Member
I upload ALL my videos to my YouTube channel (many of them as private); that way all sorted too, and if I want to find them, I just check the file name (or even download it, if I don't have the original with me)... I have over 5K videos and am always recording more, so I don't see myself ever running out of videos to upload. Hehe
I would need much better internet and 24 hour a day uploading to get all my footage on YouTube. :)
 

sloggervlogger

Well-known member
I'm very much like David. I approach it like a job. Well, it is my job 😁 . I have everything backed up on external hard drives. I've got my personal filing system where I name files by date, place filmed and animal. I catalog all these with lightroom and add tags, so they are easy to find and I know on which hard drive. I know which videos got accepted or not by a licensed agency. I know where I uploaded each video. For me this is all very important. I wouldn't use Youtube as a backup for the same reason as Ray said, and I only upload to Youtube with a watermarks, so they are no good to ever download again anyway. I also keep all the spare bits and hardly throw anything away. These bits are good for later compilations or now with the coronavirus they are vital for keeping my YouTube channel running without new footage. Also a lot of little clips that are as short as 3 seconds come handy to sell as stock footage. If you got them, you might as well use them. If you want to make a living out of it, be your own boss, you have to think about all possibilities and at least give them a try.
 

BenW

Trustworthy Member
I can't say it is a kind of job to me, but I do it also in the same way as David and SloggerVlogger. I use external hard drives as well. It is a hobby to make short videos besides my daily work and I upload videos to Vimeo (I don't earn money there) to Youtube and of course Rumble. The videos here on Rumble are shorter and different, less edited than the ones on Vimeo. Those are more short movies with titles and music.
I like my videos on Vimeo much more, but they don't work to earn money here on Rumble.
 

DavidMcNab

Trustworthy Member
I'm very much like David. I approach it like a job. Well, it is my job 😁 . I have everything backed up on external hard drives. I've got my personal filing system where I name files by date, place filmed and animal. I catalog all these with lightroom and add tags, so they are easy to find and I know on which hard drive. I know which videos got accepted or not by a licensed agency. I know where I uploaded each video. For me this is all very important. I wouldn't use Youtube as a backup for the same reason as Ray said, and I only upload to Youtube with a watermarks, so they are no good to ever download again anyway. I also keep all the spare bits and hardly throw anything away. These bits are good for later compilations or now with the coronavirus they are vital for keeping my YouTube channel running without new footage. Also a lot of little clips that are as short as 3 seconds come handy to sell as stock footage. If you got them, you might as well use them. If you want to make a living out of it, be your own boss, you have to think about all possibilities and at least give them a try.
Advice from a pro. Very wise points!
 

brenmichelle

Well-known member
The hardest part for me has been getting referrals to trust that if they keep uploading, they will see results. This would be my advice to anyone listening. Sometimes your least favorite video hits and your favorite flops. Don’t sweat bad comments, negative rumbles, or not getting full distribution. Keep uploading. Patience and persistence really does payoff here. It’s a very fun hobby for me and I don’t spend too much time shooting or editing but I’ve made over $63,000.
 

DavidMcNab

Trustworthy Member
The hardest part for me has been getting referrals to trust that if they keep uploading, they will see results. This would be my advice to anyone listening. Sometimes your least favorite video hits and your favorite flops. Don’t sweat bad comments, negative rumbles, or not getting full distribution. Keep uploading. Patience and persistence really does payoff here. It’s a very fun hobby for me and I don’t spend too much time shooting or editing but I’ve made over $63,000.
Great advice and awesome success. I've had a very similar amount after being at it for four years. Your content is always excellent!
 

MimiRabbit

Member
The hardest part for me has been getting referrals to trust that if they keep uploading, they will see results. This would be my advice to anyone listening. Sometimes your least favorite video hits and your favorite flops. Don’t sweat bad comments, negative rumbles, or not getting full distribution. Keep uploading. Patience and persistence really does payoff here. It’s a very fun hobby for me and I don’t spend too much time shooting or editing but I’ve made over $63,000.
63 000$ :eek::eek::eek::eek: big congratulations.
I think I can forget about this amount
 

TwinsKitties

Well-known member
The hardest part for me has been getting referrals to trust that if they keep uploading, they will see results. This would be my advice to anyone listening. Sometimes your least favorite video hits and your favorite flops. Don’t sweat bad comments, negative rumbles, or not getting full distribution. Keep uploading. Patience and persistence really does payoff here. It’s a very fun hobby for me and I don’t spend too much time shooting or editing but I’ve made over $63,000.
that's great you work too hard for your content (y)(y):D:D
 

TwinsKitties

Well-known member
As most of you know, I take my Rumble channel quite seriously. I approach video creation like a job in many ways and that has meant that it also pays like a job for me. Being able to work from home is an advantage now more than ever.
One of the best things that I ever did was to take a serious approach to storing and organizing my videos. I have a a lineup of data banks on my desk that total more than 35TB of storage space. I fill about one per year because a lot of what I record is 4K and I don't throw much footage away.
I organize in folders and I name all video files with something that makes sense for when I want to search the storage device a year or two later.
For me, many videos are animal related so whatever appears in the video, along with the behaviour will usually appear in the file name. I might add "smooth footage" or "best" to the name of videos that are particularly desirable.
Example: Reef shark eating scraps, best, Belize
If it's not worth sorting through, I leave it in an unsorted and unnamed folder. I might get to it later. But I don't leave much unnamed.
This has made things much easier when I suddenly get inspiration for a video and want to access the footage or simply to explore for footage I've completely forgotten I even had. Imagine how easy it is if some of your old videos suddenly seem relevant and you go looking for them.
I speak with other content creators regularly. Some have told me they are out of new footage. Others have told me that they cannot get out to record anything. I didn't realize the irony in my words, but I've often said I could edit what I have every day for a year or more if I was ever locked in the house.
Storing your videos in this manner takes a little extra time, but why put that valuable footage in a spot where you'll never be able to find it and cash in on the value?
If you ever retire, lose your job, sustain an injury, or find yourself in a global pandemic, that's the time that you can start sorting through your footage and join those who work from home.
This is a great time to organize your old files and name them. You'll likely find something to smile about and something to upload while you're doing it. And you'll save time later when you need it.

What is YOUR top tip and best advice to share with the Rumble community??
you doing great job organizing every content where it belong :D:D:D
that's great way to keep tracking every footage
 
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